Follow Mumbling Jack, my new blog

Tuesday, October 11, 2005

If I could bite into the whole earth (audio)

Just an audio version of the poem in the previous post.
this is an audio post - click to play

9 comments:

Tracy said...

Ah, the voice to the poem. "And that's how is."
I, for one, love it. Wonderful transalating.

Tracy said...

transalating! I think that's like salivating!

Translating!!!!!!!

MackJohnny said...

Ain't it more like salalivating?

the5uperu5er said...

Thanks for taking the time to find, sign up and comment me, John. There isn't a word I commit to paper that I don't think, "I wonder what John is doing and how he might say this instead..." Seriously.

I've added you to my daily reads... Great to see you online.

MackJohnny said...

Hey Judd, I was just damn pleased to find out you were kicking about.

Humble Servant said...

And that's how it is.

And then, to be sure he has really convinced himself, "that's how it is."

Some stoic--he's whistling in the wind.

MackJohnny said...

Well, yeah, he sure is. Whistling right past the graveyard, even. Trying to tell himself that because he acknowledges the graveyard is right there, and he can still pucker his lips and blow, he's okay with it being there. He's a liar.

As he says himself in Autopsicografia:

The poet is a liar who lies so well
that he can pretend to feel the pain
which is the pain he really feels.

And those who read the poet's lies
on paper, feel in the dark ink tears,
not the two pains the poet felt,
but a single pain they'll never feel.

And so on its one short loop of track,
round and round, beyond reason, he starts
the wind-up train we call the heart.

MackJohnny said...

Hmm, I think that second stanza would read better as

And those who read the poet's lies
feel, in the dark ink of tears,
not the two pains the poet felt,
but a single pain they'll never know.

Humble Servant said...

I mangled that metaphor--meant to say whistling in the dark--though there is some of the futility of whistling in the wind too.

"lies so well that he can pretend to feel the pain which is the pain he really feels"--that is really very good--you know from writing that you don't write mere reality--words reflect (in a broken way) reality in an artificiality to which the reader then brings his own assumptions. It is all a great big complex lie which is a great big complex truth.

Ha--stoics and paradoxes--if we can work in epicurianism we can do PHIL 101.